Sunday, December 11, 2005

Photos of the fist computers

Secrets of ENIAC. Pretty photos of one of the first computers in the world - ENIAC.
The Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer (ENIAC) was among the very first computers-some say it was the first, though there are competing claims. Built at Penn from 1942 to 1946, its work was the most prosaic imaginable: calculating missile ballistics and later helping with the design of the hydrogen bomb. Looking back from today, with every facet of society permeated by super-fast, ultra-miniaturized, all-but-invisible computers, the ENIAC seems ludicrously clunky and primitive. But this is where it all began.

On a more personal level, these images commemorate my family's connections to Penn in the mid-20th century, and with the group that developed the ENIAC in particular. Both of my mother's parents and two great uncles did their graduate work at Penn: my grandfather, Ralph Young, in the Economics department (where he later taught), my grandmother, Louise Young, in History, my great uncle, Chick Merwin, in Economics, and his brother, Dick Merwin, in the Moore School of Electrical Engineering, which later spawned the department of Computer and Information Science, on whose faculty I now serve.

Friday, December 09, 2005

Beautiful models - Photoshop magic

Retouching Portfolio. An interesting portfolio of a specialist on retouching the photos. Mouse over the pictures to see how Photoshop makes a women magazine model from an ordinary woman.
Below you'll find a series of my latest retouching projects. This portfolio includes some high-end fashion, editorial, advertising and high-profile celebrity work. I even included some archival restorations of my extended family and whatever else I had lying around the hard disk that looked interesting. I've included "before and after" views for demonstration purposes. Where noted, mouse over the image to preview the before and after results. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact me directly. I'd love to hear from you!

Thursday, December 08, 2005

Aerial propaganda leaflets

Aerial propaganda leaflet database. Archive of propaganda leaflets spread over the enemy territory during the war conflicts starting from the World War I.
Currently the database contains details of over 1,400 different Second World War Allied propaganda leaflets to Germany, as well as other groups of propaganda leaflets from WWII and other conflicts from WWI to the present day.

Wednesday, December 07, 2005

Russian squirrel pack 'kills dog'

Something's going really wrong in Russia if squirells started eating dogs there.

A "big" stray dog was nosing about the trees and barking at squirrels hiding in branches overhead when a number of them suddenly descended and attacked, reports say.

"They literally gutted the dog," local journalist Anastasia Trubitsina told Komsomolskaya Pravda newspaper.

"When they saw the men, they scattered in different directions, taking pieces of their kill away with them."

Original article at BBC News

Tuesday, December 06, 2005

Planet Size Comparison

Planet Size Comparison. Funny flash site to visually compare the planet sizes.

Monday, December 05, 2005

Forty-one Anomalies of Water.

Forty-one Anomalies of Water. A huge list of the most unique liquid on the Earth - water. If hadn't that many useful anomalies, life on our planet would hardly be possible.
  1. Water has unusually high melting point.
  2. Water has unusually high boiling point.
  3. Water has unusually high critical point.

Sunday, December 04, 2005

The first newspaper in Scandinavia (1749) online.

Newspaper Index proudly presents: The first newspaper in Scandinavia (1749) now online. Thу first Scandinavian newspaper has been scanned an put online.
Yesterday I was holding newspaper history in my hands. The first omnibus newspaper ever published in Scandinavia from January 1749. The owner - a gentleman who had in it in his family’s possession since it was published - let me scan it on his flatbed.

Here starts the international reporting.

Wiena: Russian troops has left for Poland, more will leave soon.
Hanover: Several people killed and about 40 injured when lightning hit a church in Diepholz.
Paris: Speculations about where Prince Edward might be. In Avignon? Maybe in Switzerland?
London: The House of Commons decided to raise the number of men in the navy to 17.000 during 1749.